Some Calton Facts

20160123_glasgow logoCalton Area  Partnership Profile 2016     

 Calton Area Partnership covers the neighbourhoods of Bridgeton, Dalmarnock, Reidvale, Gallowgate, Camlachie, Barrowfield, Parkhead, Calton and Glasgow Green.

The ward is home to Emirates Arena and the adjoining Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome, the national training centre for Athletics, Basketball, Netball, Track Cycling and Volleyball. The ward also boasts Celtic Park, which hosted the

Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games

Opening Ceremony, and  Commonwealth Games Athletes’ Village.

    

Area Partnership – Summary Information Calton Glasgow
Population (2013) 25,102 (5th lowest) 596,550
% Working Age Population   (16-60/64) 72.2% (5th highest) 68.3%
% Children (0-15) 14.1% (5th lowest) 16.2%
% Pensionable Age 13.6% (3rd lowest) 15.5%
% of Houses in Council Tax Band A 34.0% (2nd highest) 22.1%
% of Houses in Council Tax Band A-C

 

81.5% 70.3%
% Unemployed – JSA + Universal Credit (Out of Work) (Nov 2015) 3.7% 3.2%
Average Tariff Score for S4 Pupils (2012/13) 143

(LOWEST)

176

 2. Single Outcome Agreement

The Single Outcome Agreement for Glasgow 2013 sets out an agreed set of priorities between partners in the city. We have agreed to work together over ten years to re-shape existing services and develop new services in order to achieve better outcomes for residents of the city.

 The priorities of Glasgow’s Single Outcome Agreement are:

 Alcohol         Youth Employment             Vulnerable People

These are supplemented by a commitment to achieving better outcomes in particular neighbourhoods, known as our Thriving Places approach.

The Calton ward has 99 licensed premises, representing a 5.5% share of the city’s licensed premises*.

In 2014, Glasgow City had 6,403 alcohol related hospital admissions. This is a 4.5% reduction compared to the previous year, and shows a 16.5% decline over the past decade.

In the same period, the city experienced 182 alcohol related deaths. Again, this is a downwards trend, with a 3.7% reduction compared to 2013 and a 37.5% ten year reduction**. Across Glasgow’s electoral wards however, there has historically been large differences in alcohol-related death rates, with the more deprived wards generally having higher levels of alcohol-related deaths among their residents: in 2007/11 the highest alcohol-related death rate in the city was 101 deaths per 100,000 (in Calton) compared with the lowest of 19 per 100,000 (in Pollokshields).

By 2000, alcohol-related deaths in Calton were markedly higher than other wards with similar deprivation profiles, and alcohol-related mortality continued to rise sharply in the early 2000s before peaking in the mid-2000s. This trend was largely driven by deaths in men. More recently the levels of alcohol-related deaths in Calton fell back to those seen at the beginning of 2000s. It has been noted that the closure of a number of homeless hostels closed between 2005 and 2008 possibly explain the decline in alcohol-related death rates in males around this time ***.

Youth Employment  

As at 2013, Calton had the fourth highest number and third highest percentage of its population among Glasgow MME wards that was aged 16-24. This relative high level is due to Calton having the fourth highest number of people among the Glasgow MME aged 20-24. Thus, Youth Employment will be relevant for more people in Calton than is the norm across the city.

Based on the follow up destinations for pupils leaving school in 2013, 78.2% were in a “positive” destination which was the lowest level among Glasgow MME wards, below the Glasgow level of

85.0% and significantly lower than the Scottish average of 90.4%. The average tariff score for S4 pupils in Calton in that year was the lowest in Glasgow (S4 143 – Glasgow 176) and significantly below the Scottish average (193). For S6 pupils, the average tariff score (413) was the third lowest in Glasgow (S6 413 – Glasgow 489) and also significantly below the Scottish average (547).

As at November 2015, there were 135 Jobs Seekers Allowance/Out of Work Universal Credit claimants in Calton aged 16-24. This equates to 3.0% of the 16-24 population in Calton. This sits in the middle of Glasgow’s 21 MMEs and is 10% lower than the overall Glasgow city level (3.4%). Both percentages are an underestimate of the level of 18-24 year old claimants as very few 16-17 year olds (30 currently across Glasgow) are eligible to claim JSA.

The current number of young JSA claimants in Calton is less than half (40%) of the number in November 2011 (340). 22% (n30) of the young JSA claimants has been claiming for more than six months with 10 claiming for more than a year.

 Vulnerable People               

The Single Outcome Agreement Vulnerable People priority is initially targeting two themes:

In-work Poverty

City wide, an estimated 14% of working households find it difficult to cope on their current income.

Homelessness and Housing Need

The number of homeless applications made in the city is 4,974 per year. For 2014/15, 72% of the city’s homelessness assessments were undertaken by Glasgow North Social Work Services.

The thriving place approach is an additional and intensive asset based partnership approach by service providers, residents and community groups in a defined area.

It forms part of the overall approach to the delivery of Glasgow’s Single Outcome agreement. Nine thriving place areas have been identified across the city, including the Parkhead and Dalmarnock neighbourhood in Calton. These nine areas have been selected as they have exhibited poor outcomes for a number of years and present opportunities to improve on these outcomes.

Estimates of male and female life expectancy in Parkhead and Dalmarnock are lower than the Glasgow average, with women living on average for eight years longer than men.

There is a slightly higher percentage of children (18%) in the population than in Glasgow as a whole. Single parent households make up 61% of all households with dependent children. Levels of deprivation and child poverty are also significantly higher than average.

3 . Integrated Grants Fund

The Integrated Grant Fund (IGF) provides grant funding to organisations to deliver high quality and much needed services to the citizens of Glasgow across all 21 wards. Funding is allocated to meet the priorities of Glasgow City Council and of the Glasgow Community Planning Partnership. From 2015/16, the IGF will support a wide range of activity under six new grants programmes.

Across the six programmes, the Calton ward benefits from approximately £1,627,296 of IGF expenditure in 2015/16. This is in addition to the Calton Area Budget IGF allocation of £65,260, bringing the wards total IGF amount to £1,692,556. This approximation is based upon the grant amount each project receives and the population of the wards in which it makes its services accessible. In Calton, 225 projects make their services accessible to the ward’s community.

 Alcohol & Health & Wellbeing

11% of the ward’s IGF is spent on the Alcohol, Health and Wellbeing programme. 6 local projects deliver services in the ward with IGF support under this programme, in addition to 2 city wide projects that make their services accessible to the Calton community.

Youth Employment & Young People

19% of the ward’s IGF is spent on the Youth Employment and Young People programme. 10 local projects deliver services in the ward with IGF support under this programme, in addition to 16 city wide projects that make their services accessible to the Calton community.

Vulnerable People & Families

26% of the ward’s IGF is spent on the Vulnerable People & Families programme. 14 local projects deliver services in the ward with IGF support under this programme, in addition to 49 city wide projects that make their services accessible to the Calton community.

Safer Communities

11% of the ward’s IGF is spent on the Safer Communities programme. 3 local projects deliver services in the ward with IGF support under this programme, in addition to 7 city wide projects that make their services accessible to the Calton community.

Fairer Communities

10% of the ward’s IGF is spent on the Fairer Communities programme. 6 local projects deliver services in the ward with IGF support under this programme, in addition to 56 city wide projects that make their services accessible to the Calton community.

Sustainable Communities

20% of the ward’s IGF is spent on the Sustainable Communities programme. 17 local projects deliver services in the ward with IGF support under this programme, in addition to 39 city wide projects that make their services accessible to the Calton community. The rate of claiming unemployment and disability related benefits is higher than the Glasgow average. Almost a third of the population in this neighbourhood are limited by a disability.

4. Citywide Consultation

Between October 2015 – January 2016, 578 people participated in the city’s Investment Plan Consultation Survey. 19% of participants were Area Partnership members, 41% were previous or current applicants and 21% were members of a local voluntary sector network. The survey questions were focussed on identifying respondents views on what were the important priorities for the use of the AP budget. The questions covered Glasgow’s Single Outcome Agreement (SOA) priorities, thematic priorities and Neighbourhood Management.

At a city wide level, the SOA priorities identified by participants as the most important for the use of the Area Partnership’s Budget was Vulnerable People. This was followed by Youth Employment, and then by Thriving Places. Alcohol was the identified as the lowest priority in this survey out of the four SOA priorities.

For the Calton survey participants, the SOA identified as the most important for the use of the Area Partnership’s Budget was Thriving Places, followed by vulnerable people, youth employment and then alcohol. Participants also identified the following additional priorities: educational attainment, residents feeling valued, health services, housing, culture and leisure, and educational learning opportunities.

5. Local Consultation Responses

Following agreement with the Calton Area Partnership (as well as the other Area Partnerships in the north east sector), a further electronic questionnaire opened for responses on 3rd December 2015 and closed on 29th January 2016 (a total of 8 weeks).

The questionnaire was sent out via the Community Planning Partnership Twitter feed and emailed to all community groups receiving IGF funding; to all North East Community Councils; all North East

Elected Members at Local, Scottish & UK level; Members of the Scottish Youth Parliament and Young

Scot; groups in the voluntary and youth sector; all Community Planning Partners operating in the North East and the local network of housing providers – this was both with an electronic link to the questionnaire and as a hard copy which could be printed off and returned free of charge via Freepost.

All were asked to highlight and promote the survey via their own social media outlets and encourage completions. The survey was also posted on Facebook by a number of local community groups (both as electronic link and hard copy).

Colleagues in Glasgow Life made hard copies available in all 20 of their community facilities and staff were briefed to encourage residents to complete the survey, either by using the digital equipment available at the facility or to complete hard copies for manual input.

A total of 415 validated responses were received, 347 of which were completed online and 68 were hard copy questionnaires loaded manually.   60 responses were from the Calton ward.

Survey participants from the Calton area identified the top local issues as Activities at Community Facilities, followed by Services for Young People and Improving Health and Wellbeing.

Participants from the Athletes Village area identified Community Safety and Improving Health and Wellbeing as the top local priority. Bridgeton participants identified Improving Health and Wellbeing as the top local priority, followed by Activities for the Elderly. Dalmarnock survey participants identified Community Safety, Activities at Community Facilities, Neighbourhood Management and Improving Health and Wellbeing as their top local priorities.

Children’s Play Areas was identified as the top local priority by Gallowgate participants, while

Camlachie participants highlighted Community and Educational Events/Trips and Children’s Play

Areas as local priorities. For Barrowfield, the top priorities identified were Neighbourhood Management, Community Safety and Environmental Issues.

Improving Health and Wellbeing was identified as the top local priority by Parkhead participants, followed by Community Safety. For Glasgow Green, Community Safety was identified as the top local priority. The full survey responses are broken down below.

Improving Health and Wellbeing

Connecting organisations and supporting people with wider factors that affect health, including poverty, education and social isolation.

Community Safety

Preventing, reducing and containing the social, environmental and intimidatory factors, which affect people’s right to live without fear of crime and which impact upon their quality of life. It includes preventative measures that contribute to crime reduction and tackle anti-social behaviour. Community Safety is about delivering local solutions to local problems that have been identified by local people.

 Services for Young People

A planned programme of education and/or activities designed for the purpose of aiding and enhancing the personal and social development of young persons through their voluntary participation.

 Neighbourhood Management (Dog Fouling, Cleansing, Littering, etc.)

Neighbourhood Management (NM) is a process that enables local communities and service providers to work together to improve and join up services.

  Activities at Community Facilities

Public locations where members of a community gather for group activities, social support, public information, and other purposes

References

Page 1: *Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics; **NOMIS. Notes: 1) Council Tax Band A – up to the value of £27,000; Council Tax Band C – up to the value of £45,000. 2) Prior to the full implementation of the Universal Credit, Out of Work Benefits consists of Job Seekers Allowance (JSA); Employment Support Assistance/Incapacity Benefit; Lone Parent Benefit and Others on Income Related Benefits. 3) The tariff score of a pupil is calculated by simply adding together all the tariff points accumulated from all the different course levels and awards he/she attains.

Page 2: *Glasgow City Council, 2015, analysed by postcode; **The Scottish Public Health Observatory Alcohol Profile (Glasgow City); *** Glasgow Centre for Population Health, Alcohol-related harm in Glasgow, 2014.

Page 3: * Understanding Glasgow Health Profile, 2014

Page 4: All information obtained for analysis from Integrated Grant Fund Funding Proposal Forms. Ward share calculated based upon 2013 population of wards served by the project using calculation (Grant amount/total population served) x ward population.


 

 

Ward 9 – Calton

POPULATION HOUSEHOLDS AND HOUSING ECONOMY
Population (2013) (1) 25,102 Households (2011) (2) 12,919 RESIDENCE BASED
Number of Males 12,584
Number of Females 12,518 Average Household Size 1.80 Population age 16-64 (2011) (2) 17,982
Economically Active 11,241
Population by Age (2013) (1) Single Person Households 6,452 – Employees 8,747
0 to 4 1,428 – Age under 65 4,839 – Self-Employed 686
5 to 11 1,255 – Age 65 plus 1,613 – Unemployed 1,808
12 to 15 867 Multi-Adult Households 4,045 Economically Inactive 6,741
16 to 29 7,552 – All full-time Students 535
30 to 44 5,461 – All Age 65 plus 343 Benefit Claimants Age 16-64
45 to 64 5,465 – Other Households 3,167 by Client Group (2013) (6)
65 to 74 1,678 Households with Children 2,422 – Numbers
75 plus 1,396 – Single Parent 1,362 Job Seeker 935
– Other Households 1,060 ESA* and Incapacity Benefits 3,270
Population by Ethnicity (2011) (2) 24,366 Income Support/Other Benefits 1,165
White Scottish/British 19,878 Dwellings by Tenure (2013) (4) 13,830 – % of Population Age 16-64
White Irish 370 Owner Occupied 3,197 Job Seeker 5.1%
Other White 1,682 Private Rented 3,091 ESA* and Incapacity Benefits 17.7%
Mixed Ethnic Groups 83 Glasgow Housing Association 1,686 Income Support/Other Benefits 6.3%
Indian 354 Other Social Rented 5,856
Pakistani 212 WORKPLACE BASED
Bangladeshi 19 Dwellings by Type (2013) (5) 14,346
Chinese 509 Detached 57 Employee Jobs (2013) (7) 15,400
Other Asian 210 Semi-Detached 303 Full-time 9,900
African 784 Terraced 1,686 Part-time 5,500
Caribbean or Black 96 Flats and Others 12,300
Other Ethnic Group 169 Employee jobs by Broad
Dwellings by Size (2013) (5) Industrial Group (2013) (7)
Population (2011) (2) 1 or 2 Rooms 3,744 Manufacturing, Construction and Utilities 2,300
In Institutions 1,088 3 Rooms 6,490 Wholesale and Retail 2,500
4 or 5 Rooms 3,248 Professional Services ** 2,000
Electorate (2014) (3) 6 or more Rooms 355 Public Sector Services *** 4,600
ElectorsData sources: 18,600 Unknown 509 Other Activities **** 4,000
(1) National Records of Scotland Estimates 2013 * Employment Support Allowance
(2) National Records of Scotland – 2011 Census ** includes services in relation to business administration, information,
(3) Glasgow City Assessor November 2014 communications, finance, insurance, property, professional,
(4) Glasgow City Council Estimates 2013 scientific and technical
(5) Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics 2013 *** includes services in relation to public administration, education and health

(includes dwellings as part of communal establishment) **** includes motor trades, transport, storage, accommodation, food services,

  1. The Department of Work and Pensions May 2014      arts, entertainment and recreation
  2. ONS 2013 Business Register and Employment SurveyWard 9 – Calton
    POPULATION HOUSEHOLDS AND HOUSING ECONOMY
    Population (2013) (1) 25,102 Households (2011) (2) 12,919 RESIDENCE BASED
    Number of Males 12,584
    Number of Females 12,518 Average Household Size 1.80 Population age 16-64 (2011) (2) 17,982
    Economically Active 11,241
    Population by Age (2013) (1) Single Person Households 6,452 – Employees 8,747
    0 to 4 1,428 – Age under 65 4,839 – Self-Employed 686
    5 to 11 1,255 – Age 65 plus 1,613 – Unemployed 1,808
    12 to 15 867 Multi-Adult Households 4,045 Economically Inactive 6,741
    16 to 29 7,552 – All full-time Students 535
    30 to 44 5,461 – All Age 65 plus 343 Benefit Claimants Age 16-64
    45 to 64 5,465 – Other Households 3,167 by Client Group (2013) (6)
    65 to 74 1,678 Households with Children 2,422 – Numbers
    75 plus 1,396 – Single Parent 1,362 Job Seeker 935
    – Other Households 1,060 ESA* and Incapacity Benefits 3,270
    Population by Ethnicity (2011) (2) 24,366 Income Support/Other Benefits 1,165
    White Scottish/British 19,878 Dwellings by Tenure (2013) (4) 13,830 – % of Population Age 16-64
    White Irish 370 Owner Occupied 3,197 Job Seeker 5.1%
    Other White 1,682 Private Rented 3,091 ESA* and Incapacity Benefits 17.7%
    Mixed Ethnic Groups 83 Glasgow Housing Association 1,686 Income Support/Other Benefits 6.3%
    Indian 354 Other Social Rented 5,856
    Pakistani 212 WORKPLACE BASED
    Bangladeshi 19 Dwellings by Type (2013) (5) 14,346
    Chinese 509 Detached 57 Employee Jobs (2013) (7) 15,400
    Other Asian 210 Semi-Detached 303 Full-time 9,900
    African 784 Terraced 1,686 Part-time 5,500
    Caribbean or Black 96 Flats and Others 12,300
    Other Ethnic Group 169 Employee jobs by Broad
    Dwellings by Size (2013) (5) Industrial Group (2013) (7)
    Population (2011) (2) 1 or 2 Rooms 3,744 Manufacturing, Construction and Utilities 2,300
    In Institutions 1,088 3 Rooms 6,490 Wholesale and Retail 2,500
    4 or 5 Rooms 3,248 Professional Services ** 2,000
    Electorate (2014) (3) 6 or more Rooms 355 Public Sector Services *** 4,600
    ElectorsData sources: 18,600 Unknown 509 Other Activities **** 4,000
    (1) National Records of Scotland Estimates 2013 * Employment Support Allowance
    (2) National Records of Scotland – 2011 Census ** includes services in relation to business administration, information,
    (3) Glasgow City Assessor November 2014 communications, finance, insurance, property, professional,
    (4) Glasgow City Council Estimates 2013 scientific and technical
    (5) Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics 2013 *** includes services in relation to public administration, education and health

    (includes dwellings as part of communal establishment) **** includes motor trades, transport, storage, accommodation, food services,

    1. The Department of Work and Pensions May 2014      arts, entertainment and recreation
    2. ONS 2013 Business Register and Employment Survey

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